Home / Resources & Guidance / General Election: What has Care England said?

As the General Election campaigns get underway, Care England continues to be the leading voice for the care sector across trade, local and national media. Please see below for a snapshot of quotes from Professor Martin Green OBE, Chief Executive of Care England, and the coverage they’ve achieved:

 

In response to the General Election being called:

“While we are encouraged that social care was discussed during ITV’s debate, it was a shame both Sunak and Starmer shied away from making a funding commitment to our sector. Social care deserves more than lip service during this general election campaign, for the millions of people who work in the sector, receive care and support, and their loved ones. We need action, not just words.”

In response to social care being mentioned during the ITV debate:

“While we are encouraged that social care was discussed during ITV‘s debate, it was a shame both Sunak and Starmer shied away from making a funding commitment to our sector. Social care deserves more than lip service during this general election campaign, for the millions of people who work in the sector, receive care and support, and their loved ones. We need action, not just words.”

In response to the Liberal Democrat’s commitment to free personal care for adults in England:

“It is encouraging to see a major political party putting their head above the parapet and addressing social care for the first time during this General Election campaign. There’s no shying away from the fact our sector needs substantial investment, and it’s reassuring the importance of the social care sector has been recognised by the Liberal Democrats.”

Featured in BBC News, The Standard, Shropshire Star, LaingBuisson

 

In response to Labour’s work visa policy:

“Labour’s position echoes the current Government’s rhetoric around international recruitment. While we are yet to see a detailed plan of Labour’s proposals, we know that for it to be successful it must involve meaningful reform that makes the care sector a more attractive destination for domestic workers. A long-term workforce plan, with structured opportunities for progression, parity with NHS staff, and a fully-funded pay rise for the sector’s 1.5 million staff would be a good place to start.”

 

In response to Labour’s proposal for immigration:

“Labour’s proposal for a workforce and training plan for the adult social care sector is welcome. Care England has long said that in order to reduce the sector’s reliance on overseas staff, reform must be delivered that makes the sector a more attractive destination for the domestic workforce. This means boosted pay, terms and conditions, the chance for career progression and parity of esteem with colleagues in the NHS.

“If successful at the next general election, Labour must deliver on these priorities and engage in meaningful consultation with the adult social care sector in the production of its workforce and training plan.

“The judgement whether a sector has taken ‘sufficient steps’ to boost training and skills being at the discretion of the Minister is a cause for concern. Social care is used as a political football, as seen recently with the Government’s recent decision ban overseas workers bringing dependents to the UK having a detrimental impact on our sector. Care England call for this judgement to be made by an independent body.”

Featured in BBC News and Caring Times

 

In response to Conservatives and Labour agreeing to honour the £86,000 cap:

“We need all parties to state their policy on social care clearly and honour it when elected. Every single party has made promises on social care, and not one has delivered when they are in Government. We are frankly sick of hollow promises, so anything that any party promises must be delivered at the start of their first term. “

 

In response to the Conservative’s commitments to social care in their manifesto:

The Conservative Party’s plan to deliver a multi-year funding settlement for local authorities is welcome and would help deliver security to care providers and their local partners across the country. While the scale of investment is not specified, it would certainly be a step in the right direction. Otherwise, the party’s plans appear to largely represent a continuation of the current reform agenda, with little to no detail on how pledges would be achieved. That agenda has been scaled back, delayed and reformed countless times over the past five years, so there is certainly work to be done in terms of winning back trust across the sector.”

Featured in Independent, The Standard, Kent Online, Perspective

In response to iNews reports of Labour promising a £12-per-hour minimum wage for care workers

“Boosting the pay of the adult social care workforce must be a priority for the next Government. Without it, the sector cannot make meaningful progress to address staffing challenges. It is encouraging that Labour has recognised this, and now they must follow through by committing to making this sector-wide pay rise fully-funded by central Government. The ability of care providers to boost pay has been limited in recent years by chronic underfunding by local authorities, and without the resources to back this pay rise, the financial viability of the sector will be at risk.”

“Care England would encourage all parties to be bold in their thinking when it comes to remuneration for care workers. A fully-funded pay rise to £15, as we have previously called for, would have a transformational impact our sector. It would mean improved recruitment and retention prospects, driving more people into work and improving national and local economies.”

 

For Care England’s asks for an incoming government, please click here.

Care England has also outlined what the fulfilment of these asks would mean for our wider economy and society, which can be viewed here.

 

For press enquiries, please contact Antonella Corby (020) 7492 4843 or email acorby@careengland.org.uk or visit www.careengland.org.uk